The Lost Coast of Northern California

Elk Herd in Sinkyone Wilderness on Lost CoastThe remote region is known as California’s Lost Coast is only accessible by a few back roads, but breathtaking scenary and recreational opportunities challenge us to explore this vast coastline.

Sinkyone Wilderness State Park
Offering campsites, fishing, guided tours, hiking or biking, horseback trails, picnic areas, visitor center. No Avail Drinking Water. 707-986-7711 recorded message.

North end of wilderness – (Needle Rock): 36 miles southwest of Garberville/Redway on Briceland Road. Take Briceland Road west from Redway. Briceland Road becomes Mendocino County Road 435. The last 3.5 miles are unpaved, steep, & narrow.

South end of wilderness – (Usal Beach): Approximately one hour north of Fort Bragg on Highway 1 or 15 miles west of Leggett on Highway 1 from Highway 101. Look for mile marker 90.88 on Highway 1. Turn north for approximately 6 miles onto unpaved, steep, narrow road.

ROADS MAY BE IMPASSABLE IN WET WEATHER. RV’S & TRAILERS NOT RECOMMENDED.

View from top of King Mountain towards Fort BraggKing Range National Conservation Area
North of Sinkyone Wilderness is King Range National Conservation Area, managed and protected by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Roads accessing the King Range are steep and winding. Unimproved roads may only be accessible to 4-wheel-drive vehicles.

Ocean fishing and game hunting are regulated by the California Department of Fish and Game. All streams are closed to fishing. The BLM maintains six campgrounds, with tables, grills and toilets.

King Range Office is open 10am-5pm, Mon-Sat during summer, but it’s advisable to call ahead to check hours. King Range Office 707-986-5400 or Arcata Field Office 707-825-2300. ROADS MAY BE IMPASSABLE IN WET WEATHER. RV’S & TRAILERS NOT RECOMMENDED.

 

Overview

 

Lost Coast to Fort Bragg

Jackson State Forest • Inland

 

Caspar • Point Cabrillo • Mendocino

Little River • Albion • Navarro

 

Elk • Point Arena • Gualala